Poetry Playtime

Because I Wanted Jam

 

I had thought

the gray, overcast morning

would grant me solitude

in the field.

 

But I forgot

how short the season is,

the strawberries being

generous but fleeting —

like a swarm of gnats that

skirts their course as humans approach.

 

And I forgot

how early the young ones rise:

they’ve been up for hours already.

They’re past second breakfast

and have burned through screen time.

 

And they’re all here with me

in the warming field.

Asking is this one ripe

and being told

no not the white tipped ones

 

And being called to over and over

Nina. Nina. Nina come here!

The incessant voice of a mother bird trying to

push the little ones deeper into the nest

on fledging day.

Now Read This!

I’m enjoying a growing trend in Middle Grade reading: novels in verse.

book love

These stories have a narrative arc, and character development, and all the things you’d expect from a novel-length work. But, they are told through the medium of poetry rather than prose.

Two of the main things I love about this type of novel are the beauty of the language, and the accessibility of the stories. This style of writing is particularly well suited for people who claim to not like poetry, or kids who are reluctant readers. There is a lot of white space in poetry, which can be very welcoming to readers who feel stuck when they see a page full of words.

Brown_Girl_Dreaming-200brown girl dreaming (Penguin/Nancy Paulsen Books 2014) by Jaqueline Woodson (newly named Young People’s Poet Laureate) won the 2014 National Book Award.

Through a connected series of poems, Woodson chronicles her life growing up in the 1960s and 70s in both the North and the South. I gained a much deeper appreciation of the landscape of our country at that time while reading her touching, often funny, and deeply personal story.

My favorites were the “how to listen” poems.

how to listen #3

Middle of the night

my grandfather is coughing

me upright. Startled.

***

how to listen #7

Even the silence

has a story to tell you.

Just listen. Listen.

***

Give yourself the chance to listen to her words. They’re beautiful.

Cover of The Crossover by Kwame AlexanderThe Crossover (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014) by Kwame Alexander was this year’s Newbery Award Winner.

The Crossover is a heart-pumping story of basketball phemon twin-brothers Josh and Jordan Bell. But as the jacket flap says: Josh has more than hoops in his blood. He’s got a river of rhymes flowing through him – a sick flow that helps him find his rhythm when everything’s on the line.

This book is a natural summer reading pick for sports lovers. The word play, especially during scenes that describe basketball games, is really fun.

From Dribbling:

…Be careful though,

’cause now I’m CRUNKing

CrissCROSSING

FLOSSING

flipping

and my dipping will leave you

SLIPPING on the floor, while I

SWOOP in

to the finish with a fierce finger roll…

Straight to the hole:

Swooooooooooooooosh.

FREE Basketball Camp for 3rd & 4th Graders

However, it’s not exclusively for sports fans. There’s a tender story of family at the heart of this novel that will appeal to all readers.

Basketball Rule #1

In this game of life

your family is the court

and the ball is your heart.

No matter how good you are,

no matter how down you get,

always leave

your heart

on the court.

***

Happy Reading!

Poems for Your Pocket

Today is POEM IN YOUR POCKET day! How does one celebrate? By carrying around a poem or two in your pocket, and then sharing them with someone else.

My Grandpa Bill had a love of words and an incredible memory. When we visited, he would come to the bedroom door to say goodnight, and without preamble, would recite for us THE OWL AND THE PUSSYCAT by Edward Lear. I can still see his silhouette outlined by the hall light, and hear his gentle voice. Isn’t that a nice gift to send someone through life with?

One of my all time favorite kid poems is by Ogden Nash:

THE RHINOCEROS

The rhino is a homely beast,
For human eyes he’s not a feast.
Farwell, farewell, you old rhinoceros,
I’ll stare at something less prepoceros.

There are many fun and funny poetry collections for kids. Here are a few that won’t steer you wrong:

Hilarious characters like Snerry Jake speak a language all their own in this billy sook.

Hilarious characters like Snerry Jake speak a language all their own in this billy sook.

If you like Shel, you'll love Jack. "Watson Watts, upon his legs, balanced forty ostrich eggs..."

If you like Shel, you’ll love Jack. “Watson Watts, upon his legs, balanced forty ostrich eggs…”

Find a kid  to give a poem to today. I sent my seventh grader off with a poem and an eye roll this morning. It is a love poem I wrote just for her. I’ll take the eye roll, she’ll take the poem, and with any luck we’ll meet up on the other side of junior high.

For more information about how POEM IN YOUR POCKET day originated, as well a great selection of downloadable poems, click here!

You may also enjoy visiting the website of poet Jason Tandon. I’m a fan.

A TIME TO DANCE – Interview with author Padma Venkatraman

 

ATTDance

 

Have you ever read a story and wished you could ask the author questions about it? That is what happened to me while reading A TIME TO DANCE by Padma Venkatraman. And guess what? My wish came true! A hearty welcome today to Ms. Venkatraman, who graciously agreed to give us a behind the scenes peek at how this beautiful book came to be.

First, a bit about the story itself. Here is an overview, from Goodreads:

Padma Venkatraman’s inspiring story of a young girl’s struggle to regain her passion and find a new peace is told lyrically through verse that captures the beauty and mystery of India and the ancient bharatanatyam dance form. This is a stunning novel about spiritual awakening, the power of art, and above all, the courage and resilience of the human spirit.

Veda, a classical dance prodigy in India, lives and breathes dance—so when an accident leaves her a below-knee amputee, her dreams are shattered. For a girl who’s grown used to receiving applause for her dance prowess and flexibility, adjusting to a prosthetic leg is painful and humbling. But Veda refuses to let her disability rob her of her dreams, and she starts all over again, taking beginner classes with the youngest dancers. Then Veda meets Govinda, a young man who approaches dance as a spiritual pursuit. As their relationship deepens, Veda reconnects with the world around her, and begins to discover who she is and what dance truly means to her.”

Bharatamatyam is a classical dance form of South India. Here’s an example:

As I read A TIME TO DANCE I was especially carried away by the description of the dancing itself. So, the first question I asked was:

Nancy: What is your experience with Bharatanatyam dance? As I was reading, I was guessing you must have personal experience. Am I right?

Thank you for your time and for sharing your process with us, Padma! I encourage all readers to make time for A TIME TO DANCE. It’s gorgeous.

 

Halloweensie: Snip, Snap, Crack

Halloweensie pic

It’s time for Susanna Leonard Hill’s annual Halloweensie contest!

Rules:  write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (title not included in the 100 words), using the words pumpkinbroomstick, and creak in any form.  

Here’s my entry:

 

SNIP, SNAP, CRACK

 

In a deep dark corner, an old lady sits.

She cackles, and snarls, and frantically knits.

 

Click clack go her needles.

Snip snap go her bones,

As she rocks and she creaks

and her kitty cat moans.

 

She conjures up spiders, and pumpkins, and ghosts

All spun from her yarn –

“I’m so wicked!” she boasts.

 

Don’t dare approach her,

She’s all trick and no treat.

What are you doing??

Come hither, my sweet.

 

Get away from that broomstick! Skedaddle! Shoo!

You’re tiptoeing closer??

Snip

Snap

Crack

BOO!

 

Please visit Susanna Leonard Hill’s blog, because there will be tons of fun and scary weensie short stories for Halloween. Or play along and add your own!

 

Poem In Your Pocket Day

pocket_logo

Head’s up!   Thursday, April 18th, 2013 is Poem In Your Pocket day!  Originally started by the New York City Departments of Cultural Affairs and Education,  in partnership with the Office of the Mayor, PIYPD was launched in 2002 as part of the city’s National Poetry Month Celebration.  Then, in 2008, the Academy of American Poets got involved to make the day a national event.  

Each year on Poem in Your Pocket Day, people are encouraged to select a poem they love, then make copies of it to share with co-workers, students, family members, strangers…anyone!  

I first head about PIYPD from a friend, who works as the director of recreation in a small town in CT.  Several years ago, a couple of young women came in to the town offices, and handed out poems that were “small enough to fit in your pocket.”  My friend chatted with them and thanked them for the poem.  After they left, she looked down to see that the poem they had given her was written by my brother-in-law, the poet Jason Tandon.  Small world, small poems, big fun!  

I hope you’ll consider finding (or writing!) your own poem to share this year.

Here’s a nice pocket-size poem by Jason Tandon, from his upcoming collection Quality of Life ( Black Lawrence Press, May, 2013):  Your Voice.

I’m planning on handing out copies of one of my favorite poems to people I see walking their dogs on April 18th.  Here is a lovely audio of Garrison Keillor reading Jason Tandon’s :  Cleaning Up After the Dog.

And because my inner writer sometimes plays around with poetry, here’s one from me:  

Aisle 12 

Under the fluorescent din

I scan the bags for a salty, crunchy escape

You trap me to tell me that their pretzels are better, and

I shouldn’t get the ones you are stocking, because

Screw them,

Screw them.

You lean in to tell me

What was 3% is now .75, and who is supposed to live on that?

I don’t know what that means,

But I know disgruntled when it grunts.

I picture you at home that evening,

Honey I really stuck it to them today

So pleased that you got some lady in yoga pants to buy the other brand.

And as you’re gloating

That same lady is whetting her salt-puckered pretzel lips

With a nice Cabernet,

Because all I wanted was a snack.