Happy Valen”tiny’s” Day

valentinywriting-contest2017

Susanna Leonard Hill is a picture book author who loves to invite other writers out to play. She also loves holidays. (Check out her darling Groundhog Day themed book, Punxatawney Phyllis!) To celebrate Valentine’s Day, Susanna is hosting a Valentiny writing contest (“Valen-tiny because the stories are not very long and are written for little people 🙂.”)

The Contest: write a Valentines story appropriate for children (ages 12 and under) maximum 214 words (get it? 2/14?) in which someone is confused!

I love opportunities like this, because sometimes it’s fun to let go of the ‘work’ of writing and remember what fun there is in the ‘play.’ Here’s my entry!

 

Operator? (213 words)

 

Psst. Jax is giving Pax some candy fish for Valentine’s Day. Pass it on.

Jax is giving Pax a sandy fish for Valentine’s Day. Pass it on.

Jack is giving Pax a squishy fish for Valentine’s Day? Pass it on.

Jack is giving Max a fishy squish for Valentine’s Day. Pass it on.

Jack and Max are going to fish and twitch on Balancing Day? Pass it on.

Jetpacks are going to switch and mix on Ballet Dance Day. Pass it on.

Jet and Pax are doing a special trick for Valley Trance Day. Pass it on.

 Jester Flax is giving a species talk for Valentine’s Day. Pass it on.

Jack is giving Max several purple socks for Valentine’s Day? Pass it on.

 Jax is giving Pax seven people’s snacks for Valentine’s Day. Pass it on.

Jax is giving Pax some peculiar facts for Valentine’s Day. Pass it on.

Jax is giving Pax some spectacular flips for Valentine’s Day. Pass it on.

Jax is giving Pax some cinder block fish for Valentine’s Day. Now, what did you hear?

I heard: Jax is giving Pax some squished black fish for Valentine’s Day. Huh…interesting choice. If I were Jax, I’d give Pax some candy fish. Those are his favorite!

 

Happy Valentine’s Day, whatever you get!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Story of a Story

Image result for champagne popping

The POP of a champagne cork is one of my favorite sounds. There really is no time when that thoop isn’t signaling a special occasion. And last month, I got to pop open a bottle I’d been holding onto for a long time: the one that signified the sale of my first book!

I am thrilled to share here on the blog that SAY MY NAME, a middle grade novel, will be published in fall 2017 by Little Pickle Press.

Eleven-year-old Rory Mitchell can’t tell anyone his name. He’s not in a witness protection program. He’s not mute. He just can’t say Rs. Sixth grade means big problems for Rory. Not only did his former friend Brent share Rory’s most embarrassing secret, but he has also joined forces with the group of kids most likely to ruin Rory’s day. Then Brent sustains a serious brain injury in a bike accident. Rory has trouble feeling any sympathy for the “new Brent,” whose impulsive behavior and sudden mood swings make him the target of the same kind of unwanted attention Rory has endured. All Rory wants to do is play his guitar and get lost in heavy metal music. But when he is paired with Brent for a school project on Muhammad Ali, Rory must decide which is worse: being bullied, or being the bully.

This story is a culmination of many facets of my life, and is a loving nod to the field of speech-language pathology, which I practiced clinically for several years. (The speech pathologist in the book is way cooler than me, which is one of the fun things about writing fiction!)

There was a long gestation period from my inception of the idea to the signing of my contract, because I had so much to learn about writing a novel before I could really get to the heart of this one. This is not an exhaustive list of what went on, but here are some highlights of how this book came to be:

April 2012: Began first draft of a middle grade novel called “The Wicked Westerlys.” Only four chapters are written. In part because there is essentially no plot. But, a few interesting characters emerge. One of them is a boy who can’t say his own name because he has a speech impediment. (“Maybe: Rory.”)

September 2012: First document titled SAY MY NAME saved on computer named. It contains two chapters, and sketchy notes for a third.

Fall 2012: Struggling to make Rory a more complex character, I’m hit with a wave of inspiration when I go to see a 6th grade production of Cinderella. The boy who plays the prince is pronouncing R’s as W’s. And he has the voice of an angel and is rockin’ the part. I suddenly see the possibility of Rory being so much more than his speech impairment.

Late 2012/Early 2013: Begin reading almost exclusively middle grade novels. Read, read, read, and try to delve into what makes this category unique, and what is working in recently published books. Write. Chapter by chapter, my own manuscript begins to take shape. The rough draft coming out is not pretty. It’s like I’m moving in the pitch dark, feeling around for the plot, the story arc, the heart.

April 2013: Give myself the permission and gift of a writing retreat, where I hunker down and get to THE END of my crappy first draft. Give to a one trusted “non-writing” friend and her ‘intended audience’-aged kid for feedback. They are kind and encouraging.

May 2013: After submitting the first 25 pages to a contest, I find out at the regional NESCBWI conference that SAY MY NAME has won the Ruth Lander’s Glass Scholarship.

Summer, Fall 2013: Share bit by bit with my critique group. Revise. Revise. Angst. Revise.

November 2013: Enter the first 250 words of SAY MY NAME in the Baker’s Dozen auction (an online contest) on the blog called Miss Snark’s First Victim. Several agents “bid” on what portion of the manuscript they’d be willing to read (from five pages, to 10, to 25, to the full!). The agent who requested the full did not ultimately offer representation, but the auction was also about getting feedback from a variety of people on my first 250 words. Out of twenty critique comments, 13 people suggested putting more action up front. I studied the feedback and honed in on this message: “Start on the first day of school with the character trying to say his name.” So I did. And it made the beginning sooo much better.

Winter/Spring 2013-2014: Revise, revise, angst, revise. Continue sharing chapters with critique group, and revising accordingly.

Summer 2014: My manuscript has been wrestled into good enough shape to share it in full with a small group of critique partners. They provide thoughtful, deep, painful, helpful, invaluable critique. I also share again with a very few non-writing friends, and ‘intended audience’-aged kids. Their feedback is also extremely helpful. THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS STEP CANNOT BE OVERSTATED. THANK YOU, MY LOVELIES!

Late summer 2014: Begin submitting first polished chapters to agents. Begin receiving long line of rejection letters.

 

Fall 2014: Feel nearly panicky every time I think about all the work that still needs to be done to revise this manuscript into “ready to submit” shape.

Winter 2014: Go to the inaugural Fireside Retreat (a retreat of my own making that is sponsored by the empty home of my snowbird parents) with close writing friends. Tell them I am scared. Drink wine. Steel myself. Finally get started on a close-to -last BIG revision.

2015: Get really, really used to rejections. Revise and tweak whenever a rejection comes with feedback, which starts to happen more often. Am told it is a really good thing to get personal rejections. Cry.

Fall 2015: Another retreat with writer friends. Open my email to read a recent rejection to them in the hopes of getting some sympathy. Instead, see a note from a small publisher who tells me my manuscript is going to their ACTUAL ACQUISITIONS MEETING. Freak out.

Winter/Spring 2015: Hold breath.

June 2016: The publisher has that actual meeting. THEY OFFER TO BUY SAY MY NAME.

Summer 2016: Contract is signed! Spend time celebrating with friends and family. Cherish each happy moment. Rest a bit in the realization of this dream. Savor.

Image result for signing a contract

Fall 2016: And what happens now? I am awaiting notes from an editor, which will lead to a revision period of unknown length and depth. Am I nervous? You bet! Might I parlay this into another ‘writing retreat’? You bet! Am I thrilled to be sharing the story of this story with you today? You bet!

Thanks for being on my cheer squad, you faithful blog readers. Writing takes practice and I’ve had so much fun practicing it here. To be sure, I will update my progress here as progress is made. I hope you won’t get sick of me, and I hope you all stick around and maybe even come out to clink glasses with me and have your own sip of champagne next fall when SAY MY NAME enters the world in book form.

About Little Pickle Press: Little Pickle Press is dedicated to creating media that fosters kindness in young people—and doing so in a manner congruent with that mission. Lee Wind (head of the SCBWI Team Blog) wrote a nice article for website (Cynsations) about Little Pickle Press. Click here to find out more about this socially-conscious publishing house!

 

No Peeking!

The 5th Annual Holiday Contest!
christmas tree beautiful christmas tree beautiful christmas tree ...

This week I’m playing in Susanna Leonard Hill’s holiday contest: Write a children’s story, 350 words maximum, beginning with any version of “Rocking around the Christmas tree at the Christmas party hop.”

Here is my entry (y’all sing along now)…

 

NO PEEKING!

 

Sneakin’ around the present stash

At the bottom of the tree,

In stealth mode, got my ninja on,

Look how black-ops I can be!

 

I shouldn’t look, but too late now,

Hey, I think this one’s for me!

Later I might regret this choice,

But right now I’ve got to see.

 

Santa, please forgive me sir, it’s awfully hard to wait.

Voices saying, “It’s not Christmas – put that present down right now, Miss!”

 

Sneakin’ around the present stash

Is the most fun thing to do.

Parents are at their office bash,

If you were me, you’d peek too!

 

Here I go, I’m gonna open just one little gift.

Peel the tape slow, careful – don’t tear…

 

Jokes on me now, I got UNDERWEAR!

 

Wrap it back up, no time to waste

Hide this sneaky thing I did.

I’ll call St. Nick and plead my case,

“Please remember, I’m a kid!”

Presents

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

 

 

Halloweensie: Snip, Snap, Crack

Halloweensie pic

It’s time for Susanna Leonard Hill’s annual Halloweensie contest!

Rules:  write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (title not included in the 100 words), using the words pumpkinbroomstick, and creak in any form.  

Here’s my entry:

 

SNIP, SNAP, CRACK

 

In a deep dark corner, an old lady sits.

She cackles, and snarls, and frantically knits.

 

Click clack go her needles.

Snip snap go her bones,

As she rocks and she creaks

and her kitty cat moans.

 

She conjures up spiders, and pumpkins, and ghosts

All spun from her yarn –

“I’m so wicked!” she boasts.

 

Don’t dare approach her,

She’s all trick and no treat.

What are you doing??

Come hither, my sweet.

 

Get away from that broomstick! Skedaddle! Shoo!

You’re tiptoeing closer??

Snip

Snap

Crack

BOO!

 

Please visit Susanna Leonard Hill’s blog, because there will be tons of fun and scary weensie short stories for Halloween. Or play along and add your own!