Out & About: Literary Excursions in Central Connecticut

Have you ever wished you could live inside your favorite novel? If you live near or have a chance to visit central Connecticut, your wish just may come true!

Excursion #1: The Storytellers Cottage 

Level: Older kids to Adult

Book Pairing Suggestion: PERSUASION, the last fully complete novel written by Jane Austen. The story of young Englishwoman Anne Elliot and her second chance at love with Navy Captain Frederick Wentworth will set you in the perfect mind frame for visiting this unique space.

Middle Grade Book Pairing Suggestion:  ALL’S FAIRE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL by Victoria Jamieson.  Eleven-year-old Imogen (Impy) has been homeschooled by her parents, who work at a Renaissance Faire. She’s eager to begin her training as a squire, but the complexities of fitting into her new public school friend group are kind of getting in the way!

The Storyteller’s Cottage opened it’s charming doors in October 2017. This uniquely appointed Victorian home is a place where literature truly comes to life. A directional sign adjacent to the front porch points visitors to such memorable locations such as Narnia and The Shire.

From the moment you enter, the Cottage invites you to “immerse yourself in a different time and place…Indulge your passion with like-minded bibliophiles as a member of one of our unique literary societies, or at our charming dramatic events, or in our novel (& inspired) mystery game rooms. We host book clubs, writer’s retreats, author talks, murder mystery dinners, dapper cos-play LARP, 4-D theater productions, and much more.”

 

The Cottage is very welcoming to writers, offering a variety of nooks & crannies to hunker down in when you’re looking to create. (There is a medieval keep room that you access by going behind a moving bookshelf!!) They also host writing retreats, as well as writing workshops for both adults and children. Or, you can join in one of their growing number of book clubs, which include groups such as “The Great British Baking Club” and the “Jane Austen Teacup Lunch Bunch.”

Another fun offering is their Great Scott Escape Rooms. “A variation of the popular ‘Escape Room’ live escape game, the Great Scott! Mystery Rooms offer players a chance to actually become detectives, just like characters in their favorite mystery novels. Bring your team of up to 8 people, and immerse yourself in a classicmystery story. Each of our three game rooms is full of codes, riddles, puzzles, and clues, and you will have one hour to solve the mystery we’ve set for you!”

There is so much going on at the Storyteller’s Cottage! Be sure to visit their website to see many more pictures and get a flavor of the huge number of events offered.

 

Excursion #2:

The Amazing Castle™at the Avon Free Public Library (limited time; traveling exhibit)

Level: Preschool to early elementary school

Book Pairing Suggestion: THERE WAS AN OLD DRAGON WHO SWALLOWED A KNIGHT by Penny Parker Klostermann. This is a fun read-aloud picture book which Kirkus calls “a rollicking and warped Medieval take on the well-worn cumulative rhyme.”

dragon

The Amazing Castle™ is an interactive medieval exhibit on the floor of the Children’s Room at the Avon Library. Kids have free reign of the castle and all its inner-workings. There are lots of opportunities for pretend play, such as cooking in the castle’s stone fireplace. The Amazing Castle™ exhibit was created by the Minnesota Children’s Museum with funding from Curtis and Marjorie Nelson and The Curtis L. Carlson Family Foundation, and will only be at the library until May 12, 2018. So check it out!

 

P.S. Central Connecticut is also home to the Mark Twain House and Museum! Are your bags packed yet?

The Story of a Story

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The POP of a champagne cork is one of my favorite sounds. There really is no time when that thoop isn’t signaling a special occasion. And last month, I got to pop open a bottle I’d been holding onto for a long time: the one that signified the sale of my first book!

I am thrilled to share here on the blog that SAY MY NAME, a middle grade novel, will be published in fall 2017 by Little Pickle Press.

Eleven-year-old Rory Mitchell can’t tell anyone his name. He’s not in a witness protection program. He’s not mute. He just can’t say Rs. Sixth grade means big problems for Rory. Not only did his former friend Brent share Rory’s most embarrassing secret, but he has also joined forces with the group of kids most likely to ruin Rory’s day. Then Brent sustains a serious brain injury in a bike accident. Rory has trouble feeling any sympathy for the “new Brent,” whose impulsive behavior and sudden mood swings make him the target of the same kind of unwanted attention Rory has endured. All Rory wants to do is play his guitar and get lost in heavy metal music. But when he is paired with Brent for a school project on Muhammad Ali, Rory must decide which is worse: being bullied, or being the bully.

This story is a culmination of many facets of my life, and is a loving nod to the field of speech-language pathology, which I practiced clinically for several years. (The speech pathologist in the book is way cooler than me, which is one of the fun things about writing fiction!)

There was a long gestation period from my inception of the idea to the signing of my contract, because I had so much to learn about writing a novel before I could really get to the heart of this one. This is not an exhaustive list of what went on, but here are some highlights of how this book came to be:

April 2012: Began first draft of a middle grade novel called “The Wicked Westerlys.” Only four chapters are written. In part because there is essentially no plot. But, a few interesting characters emerge. One of them is a boy who can’t say his own name because he has a speech impediment. (“Maybe: Rory.”)

September 2012: First document titled SAY MY NAME saved on computer named. It contains two chapters, and sketchy notes for a third.

Fall 2012: Struggling to make Rory a more complex character, I’m hit with a wave of inspiration when I go to see a 6th grade production of Cinderella. The boy who plays the prince is pronouncing R’s as W’s. And he has the voice of an angel and is rockin’ the part. I suddenly see the possibility of Rory being so much more than his speech impairment.

Late 2012/Early 2013: Begin reading almost exclusively middle grade novels. Read, read, read, and try to delve into what makes this category unique, and what is working in recently published books. Write. Chapter by chapter, my own manuscript begins to take shape. The rough draft coming out is not pretty. It’s like I’m moving in the pitch dark, feeling around for the plot, the story arc, the heart.

April 2013: Give myself the permission and gift of a writing retreat, where I hunker down and get to THE END of my crappy first draft. Give to a one trusted “non-writing” friend and her ‘intended audience’-aged kid for feedback. They are kind and encouraging.

May 2013: After submitting the first 25 pages to a contest, I find out at the regional NESCBWI conference that SAY MY NAME has won the Ruth Lander’s Glass Scholarship.

Summer, Fall 2013: Share bit by bit with my critique group. Revise. Revise. Angst. Revise.

November 2013: Enter the first 250 words of SAY MY NAME in the Baker’s Dozen auction (an online contest) on the blog called Miss Snark’s First Victim. Several agents “bid” on what portion of the manuscript they’d be willing to read (from five pages, to 10, to 25, to the full!). The agent who requested the full did not ultimately offer representation, but the auction was also about getting feedback from a variety of people on my first 250 words. Out of twenty critique comments, 13 people suggested putting more action up front. I studied the feedback and honed in on this message: “Start on the first day of school with the character trying to say his name.” So I did. And it made the beginning sooo much better.

Winter/Spring 2013-2014: Revise, revise, angst, revise. Continue sharing chapters with critique group, and revising accordingly.

Summer 2014: My manuscript has been wrestled into good enough shape to share it in full with a small group of critique partners. They provide thoughtful, deep, painful, helpful, invaluable critique. I also share again with a very few non-writing friends, and ‘intended audience’-aged kids. Their feedback is also extremely helpful. THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS STEP CANNOT BE OVERSTATED. THANK YOU, MY LOVELIES!

Late summer 2014: Begin submitting first polished chapters to agents. Begin receiving long line of rejection letters.

 

Fall 2014: Feel nearly panicky every time I think about all the work that still needs to be done to revise this manuscript into “ready to submit” shape.

Winter 2014: Go to the inaugural Fireside Retreat (a retreat of my own making that is sponsored by the empty home of my snowbird parents) with close writing friends. Tell them I am scared. Drink wine. Steel myself. Finally get started on a close-to -last BIG revision.

2015: Get really, really used to rejections. Revise and tweak whenever a rejection comes with feedback, which starts to happen more often. Am told it is a really good thing to get personal rejections. Cry.

Fall 2015: Another retreat with writer friends. Open my email to read a recent rejection to them in the hopes of getting some sympathy. Instead, see a note from a small publisher who tells me my manuscript is going to their ACTUAL ACQUISITIONS MEETING. Freak out.

Winter/Spring 2015: Hold breath.

June 2016: The publisher has that actual meeting. THEY OFFER TO BUY SAY MY NAME.

Summer 2016: Contract is signed! Spend time celebrating with friends and family. Cherish each happy moment. Rest a bit in the realization of this dream. Savor.

Image result for signing a contract

Fall 2016: And what happens now? I am awaiting notes from an editor, which will lead to a revision period of unknown length and depth. Am I nervous? You bet! Might I parlay this into another ‘writing retreat’? You bet! Am I thrilled to be sharing the story of this story with you today? You bet!

Thanks for being on my cheer squad, you faithful blog readers. Writing takes practice and I’ve had so much fun practicing it here. To be sure, I will update my progress here as progress is made. I hope you won’t get sick of me, and I hope you all stick around and maybe even come out to clink glasses with me and have your own sip of champagne next fall when SAY MY NAME enters the world in book form.

About Little Pickle Press: Little Pickle Press is dedicated to creating media that fosters kindness in young people—and doing so in a manner congruent with that mission. Lee Wind (head of the SCBWI Team Blog) wrote a nice article for website (Cynsations) about Little Pickle Press. Click here to find out more about this socially-conscious publishing house!

 

Author Stacy Mozer finds THE SWEET SPOT

First Base: Welcome today to author Stacy Mozer, and a big “outta the park” congratulations on her middle grade novel THE SWEET SPOT, which debuts 3/25/16! Stacy doesn’t know this but she was one of the first people I met in SCBWI (Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators). She was giving a talk on critique techniques/critique groups at a conference. I remember thinking, “I don’t even know if I belong here.” Six years later, I’m still a part of the same critique group that I joined based on her encouragement.
Second Base: Let’s turn our attention to THE SWEET SPOT!

When thirteen-year-old Sam Barrette’s baseball coach tells her that her attitude’s holding her back, she wants to hit him in the head with a line drive. Why shouldn’t she have an attitude? As the only girl playing in the 13U league, she’s had to listen to boys and people in the stands screaming things like “Go play softball,” all season, just because she’s a girl. Her coach barely lets her play, even though she’s one of the best hitters on the team.

All stakes now rest on Sam’s performance at baseball training camp. But the moment she arrives, miscommunication sets the week up for potential disaster. Placed at the bottom with the weaker players, she will have to work her way up to A league, not just to show Coach that she can be the best team player possible, but to prove to herself that she can hold a bat with the All-Star boys.

 
Third Base: Stacy kindly answered my questions about herself, her writing, and THE SWEET SPOT.
NT: How did your writing career begin? What other kinds of hats have you worn in your professional life?
SBM: My writing career began when a group of third grade students told me that there was no way a real author who wrote real books could possibly revise as much as I asked them to revise. I told them that I would write a book to find out. That book is still in revision. It’s been over ten years. In my professional life I have only been an elementary teacher but that has always come with many hats; teacher, mentor, curriculum writer, therapist, counselor, reader, mathematician, scientist…you name it, elementary school teachers do it every day.
NT: What were you like as a kid? Were you sporty like Sam? Would you have been friends with her?
SBM: I was a pretty quiet kid. The smart, bookish, teacher’s pet type. I was not an athlete. I loved baseball, but as a Mets fan, not a player. I admired the sporty athletic girls and would go to their games, but was never one myself. So I might have wanted to be friends with Sam, but unless she was also a singer or an drama geek, I may not have had a chance to have met her.
NT: What kind of books did you like as a 13-year-old?
SBM: My main genre to read has always been high fantasy. I loved getting whisked away in imagined worlds full of adventure. At 14 I think I also loved The Sweet Valley High books and other books about girls who were in high school.
NT:  What are you working on next?
SBM: Right now I’m working on book 2 in The Sweet Spot series, which is called The Perfect Trip. It will be releasing from Spellbound River this time next year. I am also still revising the middle grade high fantasy book I wrote those many years ago when my class challenged me.
NT: Any advice for other writers and creative types?
SBM: It will sound cliche, but make sure to never give up on this dream. It is so easy to want to give up. Publishing is a business full of rejection and it moves as fast as a snail. Try to write because you love it and the rest will come — it just might take a long time. As the critique group coordinator for NESCBWI I also have to remind your readers of how important it is to find your tribe as you move forward. Whether it’s people you meet with to discuss your work or just a supportive group of writer friends, no one gets this the way other writers do.
 

Home Run: THE SWEET SPOT ebook is available for pre-order on Kindle at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01D8VYWK6 and in iBooks

Or, in paperback (tomorrow) from Spellbound River Press  http://www.SpellboundRiver.com
For signed paperback copies, contact Diane’s Books in Greenwich 203-869-1515. Ask for Maria or Theresa.
 
Extra Innings: You can enter below to win your own copy of THE SWEET SPOT. Just click on the Rafflecopter link to enter!
 
Rafflecopter Giveaway:
Stacy Barnett Mozer is a third grade teacher and a mom. She started writing books when a class of students told her that there was no way that a real author who wrote real books could possibly revise their work as much as she asked them to revise. She’s been revising her own work ever since. 
Social Media Links:
 
 
 

 

WILL’S WORDS: Interview with children’s author Jane Sutcliffe

Little and Often Makes Much

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I don’t run. But I am fascinated by people who do, especially marathoners and other long distance runners. It took me a while to figure out what all those “26.2” bumper stickers meant. Honestly, I briefly thought it was something political (26.2 more days of so-and-so in office?). Then a friend started training to run a marathon and…Oh! That’s what that means.

Of course runners do not start with marathons. Consistent training sessions with gradually increasing miles, over a long period of time, are what lead to success on race day.

And so many worthwhile things in life are like that. Sometimes a far away goal looms so large, and seems so unattainable, that we stop trying before we begin. That will never happen is a refrain that keeps us in place. But what if you do start trying?

LittleandOften

 

What if you did one thing every day that got you closer to your goal? One cookie left on the plate. One closet organized. One chapter of a book written. Over time, the little steps start to add up. It’s like seeing someone else’s child after all long time: we are amazed at how much they’ve grown! But to the parents, and to the child themselves, it was incremental. Tiny, everyday changes that go unnoticed in the moment can add up to something huge.

MeasureGoal

Today I am celebrating a “my how you’ve grown” moment: finishing the first draft of my second novel. As I was working on it, I sometimes felt like a chicken looking for grain – peck, peck, peck. And then one day I realized I was past the half-way mark. Then I wrote the climactic scene. Then I was working on the last chapter. Step by step. Page by page. Line by line.

 

I'm also obviously a lover of Chinese food.

I’m also obviously a lover of Chinese food.

What will you choose to take one step towards today? It may not be a marathon. Or a novel. But whatever it is, you have the power to get there. Go for it!

 

Destiny

Retreat! Retreat!

 The Writing Retreat

A tricky plot, I’ve lost my thought

I need to clear my head

My characters stink and I can’t think

My muse needs watered and fed

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So I’m off, down the road, take a right at the lane

To a fireside ‘cross the bay

Gonna clear my noggin, and quick my sloggin’

Gonna breath, and write all day

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Good friends, good food, and a bottle or four

Close the door, shut it tight, lock and latch it

The first draft needs words, and a problem to solve

The revision just might need a hatchet.

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I’ll wrangle and tangle my story until

A thin ray of hope starts to rise

And that night I’ll drink deep from the well of content

My eyes will be back on the prize

*****

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Far from a cry of defeat, the word retreat actually can mean a purposeful movement towards sanity.

Making a conscious effort to give your goals a solid chunk of attention is a very powerful way to tell yourself, and others, what is important to you right now.

For the next four days, I’m off to the Fireside Retreat – a writing getaway of my own design. I’ll be surrounded by peace and quiet and the occasional laugh from the talented friends who are joining me. We’ll also be meeting with Newbery Award winning author Cynthia Voigt who has graciously offered to share her time and insights with us. And all of this is because I had an idea, and asked for some favors and some help.

Maybe it’s time for you to plan a girl’s or guy’s weekend so you can focus on treasured friendships. Or, perhaps you crave a prefab or self-designed retreat for writers, crafters,  fitness junkies, spiritual seekers, or whatever is your current passion.

Make the time, make the arrangements, make you a priority! Retreat!

A TIME TO DANCE – Interview with author Padma Venkatraman

 

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Have you ever read a story and wished you could ask the author questions about it? That is what happened to me while reading A TIME TO DANCE by Padma Venkatraman. And guess what? My wish came true! A hearty welcome today to Ms. Venkatraman, who graciously agreed to give us a behind the scenes peek at how this beautiful book came to be.

First, a bit about the story itself. Here is an overview, from Goodreads:

Padma Venkatraman’s inspiring story of a young girl’s struggle to regain her passion and find a new peace is told lyrically through verse that captures the beauty and mystery of India and the ancient bharatanatyam dance form. This is a stunning novel about spiritual awakening, the power of art, and above all, the courage and resilience of the human spirit.

Veda, a classical dance prodigy in India, lives and breathes dance—so when an accident leaves her a below-knee amputee, her dreams are shattered. For a girl who’s grown used to receiving applause for her dance prowess and flexibility, adjusting to a prosthetic leg is painful and humbling. But Veda refuses to let her disability rob her of her dreams, and she starts all over again, taking beginner classes with the youngest dancers. Then Veda meets Govinda, a young man who approaches dance as a spiritual pursuit. As their relationship deepens, Veda reconnects with the world around her, and begins to discover who she is and what dance truly means to her.”

Bharatamatyam is a classical dance form of South India. Here’s an example:

As I read A TIME TO DANCE I was especially carried away by the description of the dancing itself. So, the first question I asked was:

Nancy: What is your experience with Bharatanatyam dance? As I was reading, I was guessing you must have personal experience. Am I right?

Thank you for your time and for sharing your process with us, Padma! I encourage all readers to make time for A TIME TO DANCE. It’s gorgeous.

 

Halloweensie: Snip, Snap, Crack

Halloweensie pic

It’s time for Susanna Leonard Hill’s annual Halloweensie contest!

Rules:  write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (title not included in the 100 words), using the words pumpkinbroomstick, and creak in any form.  

Here’s my entry:

 

SNIP, SNAP, CRACK

 

In a deep dark corner, an old lady sits.

She cackles, and snarls, and frantically knits.

 

Click clack go her needles.

Snip snap go her bones,

As she rocks and she creaks

and her kitty cat moans.

 

She conjures up spiders, and pumpkins, and ghosts

All spun from her yarn –

“I’m so wicked!” she boasts.

 

Don’t dare approach her,

She’s all trick and no treat.

What are you doing??

Come hither, my sweet.

 

Get away from that broomstick! Skedaddle! Shoo!

You’re tiptoeing closer??

Snip

Snap

Crack

BOO!

 

Please visit Susanna Leonard Hill’s blog, because there will be tons of fun and scary weensie short stories for Halloween. Or play along and add your own!

 

NO IFS, ANDS, OR BUTTS – What to do when your BIC becomes a PIA

Jane Yolen is a prolific writer of children’s books and poetry. On her website, she answers some FAQs, including this one:

“Do you have a secret that makes you so productive?

Want to know my secret? BIC.

That’s right. BIC. Butt in chair. There is no other single thing that will help you more to become a writer.

William Faulkner said: “I write only when I’m inspired. Fortunately I’m inspired at 9 o’clock every morning.”

BIC.”

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Whether you are a writer or not, so many of our “productive” accomplishments require sitting down and focusing on the task at hand.

Still haven’t organized photos from two years ago? You need to get your BIC. Catching up on a mountian of email? BIC. Deadline at work? BIC. Writing a novel? Certainly BIC.

So what happens once you have overcome all the procrastination trolls that life throws at you? When you actually sit down, with BIC, and do the work?

For one thing, stuff actually gets done. (Huh! It works!).  For another, you may experience a problem I encountered when I finally sat myself down and wrote a novel-length manuscript.

My BIC became a big pain in the aspirations.

My solution involved an orthopedist and a physical therapist, but if you start early and take care of your assets, perhaps you can avoid this route.

Here are some things that worked for me:

1) Pull out the old baby stuff.  Who else has a “Boppy” in their closet? It makes a great soft seat and can help encourage a more upright posture.

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Also, an old nursing stool can be the perfect height and angle for a foot rest under a writing desk.  Adjusting my leg positioning seems to help; you may want to give it a try, too.

2) Beyond the Boppy, I tried several sit-upons that at least provided temporary relief.

IMG_2050This is a memory foam pillow that probably never guessed the impressions it would be made to support.

IMG_2051This is a classically designed posture pillow.  I was surprised that something “seen on TV” actually worked. But it does!

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The big ball! So much fun, so good for your back and bum. Mine is a little short for my desk, and I do find my concentration is not as great when I’m bouncing around. But for the end of the day tired tuchas, nothing beats the ball.

Except…

3) The standing desk.

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Many writing friends of mine have gone so far as to build treadmill desks, which I think are fantastic. But try just looking around your house until you find a counter surface or table that’s a good height for you. (I am fortunate that the bookshelf in my writing nook has a cupboard door that opens to the perfect height for me.) You will burn more calories while standing, but also, you will be able to keep working!  Added bonus points if you have a squishy gel mat you can move to your standing area.

4) If things are already to the point of pain, try this simple exercise:

Stand on one leg. Now, try to close your eyes and balance for 30 seconds. You will need to squeeze your standing-leg butt cheek very hard to keep from falling. Repeat several times a day to minimize pain and get “maximus” power.

5) When all else fails, get a dog. I guarantee you will not be able to sit still for more than an hour at a time without being encouraged by your little friend to get up and go for a walk!

You done with that blog post yet?

You done with that blog post yet?

I wish you a happy, healthy, productive day!

THE PRANK LIST; Interview with children’s author Anna Staniszewski

Welcome Anna Stanizewski, whose latest novel, THE PRANK LIST (Sourebooks) will be released July 1, 2014!

AnnaStan

Anna is the author of many books for children and young adults, including:

THE UNFAIRY TALE LIFE SERIES

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THE DIRT DIARY SERIES

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..and two upcoming picture books from Henry Holt: POWER DOWN, LITTLE ROBOT (2015) and DOGOSAURUS REX (2016). 

Needless to say, Anna is one busy writer! However, I’m happy to say she had the time to answer a few of my questions about herself, her writing, and THE PRANK LIST.

To start, here’s a little history (some dirt?) from Anna’s website on book one in The Dirt Diary Series, THE DIRT DIARY (Sourcebooks, 2014):

Eighth grade never smelled so bad.

Rachel Lee didn’t think anything could be worse than her parents splitting up. She was wrong. Working for her mom’s new house-cleaning business puts Rachel in the dirty bathrooms of the most popular kids in the eighth grade. Which does not help her already loser-ish reputation. But her new job has surprising perks: enough dirt on the in-crowd to fill up her (until recently) boring diary. She never intended to reveal her secrets, but when the hottest guy in school pays her to spy on his girlfriend Rachel decides to get her hands dirty.

And now, the wait is nearly over to find out what trouble Rachel gets into next, in THE PRANK LIST. Again, from Anna’s website:

Rachel never thought she’d fight for the right to clean toilets, but she has to save her mom’s business. Nothing can distract her from her mission – except maybe Whit, the cute new guy in cooking class. Then she discovers something about Whit that could change everything. After destroying her Dirt Diary, Rachel thought she was done with secrets, but to save her family’s business, Rachel’s going to have to get her hands dirty. Again.

Nancy: Congratulations on your latest series, The Dirt Diaries! How do you approach writing a series?  That is, how much is done on the sequels before book one is even sent out?

Anna: The timing of a series can make your head spin! With the Dirt Diary series, the second book was done before the first one was published and the third book is in copyedits right now, a couple of weeks before the second book comes out. It can be a little confusing to jump between writing one book, promoting another, and planning out yet another, but it’s also really exciting.

Nancy: Your main character, Rachel, seems like the kind of girl that would be easy to relate to. I think we’ve all had times when our good intentions were misconstrued, or flat-out backfired.  How much of Rachel comes from your own experiences?

Anna: The antics that Rachel gets up to are purely fictional. (I’ve always been far too much of a rule follower to pull pranks on people!) But Rachel’s emotions and quirks are based on real life. I was very shy when I was young, and I always felt like I was doing and saying the wrong thing. I took those feelings from middle school and exaggerated them for Rachel’s story.

Nancy: Again, like many people, Rachel seems to have trouble resisting requests from cute boys. A couch potato at heart, I once went on a weeklong hike (and lost many toenails) because of a crush.  Do you have your own “what was I thinking?” story that stems from wanting to please someone?

Anna: Haha, I cringe even thinking about this, but I once pretended to be into a whole type of music because I thought it would impress a boy. I bought CDs of bands I didn’t like and forced myself to listen to them. Luckily, my ears couldn’t take it after a few days and I gave up. 🙂

Nancy: Rachel works as a house cleaner to help out her mom’s new business.  I’ve done that job, and it was hard, and kind of awful. What was your first job? What has been your hardest/worst job?

Anna: One of my first jobs was at a bagel place where I worked the registers, toasted bagels, and helped make sandwiches. During lunchtime, there was literally a line out the door every single day. I liked the people I worked with, but I would come home exhausted, reeking of coffee, and totally sick of bagels. I also worked for a temp agency during college, and at many of my temp jobs (doing data entry, answering phones, etc) people would talk about me right in front of me as if I wasn’t there. It was mortifying and belittling. I have a feeling both of those jobs have worked their way into my books. 🙂

Nancy:  When you were in eighth grade, what were your favorite kinds of books?

Anna: In eighth grade I went through a huge Stephen King phase. I tore my way through The Dark Half, The Shining, etc. The darker the better! I still enjoy a good dark read these days, but I think my taste in books has lightened up a bit since then.

Nancy: If you could time travel, and you had two minutes with your eighth grade self, what would you tell her? (I know for me, I would take at least a few seconds of that time to say for heaven’s sake, enough with the perms!)

Anna: Haha, yes, I think I would have some words for bad hair and fashion, too! But I think ultimately I’d tell my eighth-grade self that it’s okay to be weird. When I was young, people would tell me I was a weirdo (because of my sense of humor, my non-permed hair, etc) and I would let it cut me down. Now I realize that weirdness is an asset. Without it, I wouldn’t be able to write the books I do!

To find out more about Anna Staniszewski (including how to say her last name!), her books, and her writing process,  visit her gorgeous and fun website, www.annastan.com.

THE PRANK LIST is available for pre-order via AmazonB&NPowell’sBook Depository, and Indiebound

prank list cover 2

Bio:

Born in Poland and raised in the United States, Anna Staniszewski grew up loving stories in both Polish and English. Currently, she lives outside Boston with her husband and their crazy dog. When she’s not writing, Anna spends her time reading, daydreaming, and challenging unicorns to games of hopscotch. She is the author of the My Very UnFairy Tale Life series and the Dirt Diary series. Her newest book, The Prank List, releases on July 1st from Sourcebooks. You can visit Anna at www.annastan.com.